Short-Termism – Investors’ Returns

By Drew P. Wilson, CFA

This is the third in a series of posts about short-termism from FAM Value Fund Co-Manager Drew Wilson.

There are any number of reasons investors may find it difficult to achieve their financial goals. In some cases, unexpected and uncontrollable events can wreak havoc on a financial plan. But it is often an investor’s own actions that lead to the failure of meeting their objectives. There is a branch of science called Behavioral Finance dedicated to exploring how an individual’s propensities and predilections can short circuit rational investment decisions.

Unfortunately, in my opinion, there is a powerful gravitational pull that has fostered a short-term mindset with many investors. This force comes from academicians, practitioners, pundits, and the financial press who promote – wittingly or unwittingly – return-diminishing behaviors such as market-timing and performance-chasing.

How well does a short-term investment approach work? In my next post I’ll highlight a compelling research study that compares performance-chasing versus buy-and-hold behaviors. At FAM, we have a long-term approach; however, despite consistent results for buy-and-hold strategies, this research study exposes a challenge the investment industry faces. Stay tuned.

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